Courses for Graduate or Advanced Studies

The coursework leading to a Ph.D. in Cell and Developmental Biology has been developed to allow maximum flexibility in choosing a research field, while still providing students with a broad background in current concepts in cell and developmental biology, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology. As a student entering the program in Cell and Developmental Biology (CDB) you will, of course, be a PIBS student in the first year and will enroll in the first year PIBS curriculum. When you choose to carry out research in a laboratory in CDB, you will enroll in our Seminar in Cell and Developmental Biology course, 801. You will also select additional program courses, cognates and electives from the offerings of the University of Michigan, as described in the PIBS curriculum bulletin.

 A minimum of 36 credits is required for candidacy. The preliminary examination consists of a modified NIH-style grant application, that students write over a four-week period. Teaching in the student's area of interest is also expected as part of the Ph.D. program.

530 Cell Biology (3)

This graduate course is designed to present basic information as well as the most recent developments in key areas of cell biology. Course consists of both lectures by faculty in their areas of expertise and small discussion groups that delve more deeply into lecture material and discuss primary literature. Both will expose students to current experimental approaches in cell biology. Students will be expected to demonstrate their knowledge of course material by participation in discussion groups and by examinations. For more information see syllabus. 

Tsai

 

450/550Histology (4)

Through the Looking Glass - From Stem Cells to Tissues and Organs. The broad objective of the course is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the microscopic structure and function of tissues and organs of the body. Through lectures and laboratory work, students should gain a basic understanding of: 1) how structural specializations of cells reflect their functions; 2) how cells associate to perform their specialized functions; 3) how groups of cells (tissues) associate to form organs; and 4) how this organization enables each organ system to carry out its function; 5)how stem contribute to tissue formation and regeneration. Students are evaluated via bi-weekly quizzes as well as a midterm and a final examination, all of which are online and open-book. 

Hortsch 

 

580 Developmental Biology (3)

This course is a graduate-level introduction to the principles of development, with an emphasis on current research topics that illustrate fundamental principles. Early events in development will be the focus of the course including how cells divide, differentiate, and form tissues and organs in the correct position. Primary developmental processes including fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, neurulation and organogenesis will be studied, using a variety of model systems. The organizational structure of the course includes lectures by CDB and guest faculty, with discussion sessions approximately every two weeks. Students are expected to read assigned material from the textbook and journal articles, and to participate actively in discussion sessions. 

Barolo  

598 Directed Readings in Cell and Developmental Biology 1-4

599 Directed Research in Cell and Developmental Biology 1–4

680 Organogenesis of Complex Tissues (3)

CDB 680 will cover multiple aspects of organogenesis, including: morphological and molecular events underlying organ formation; quantitative aspects of gradient formation, tissue modeling and cell behavior; in vitro and in vivo experimental systems; parallel pathways for organ formation in various model organisms; adult organ structure and pathology; organ regeneration/repair; stem cell systems: cell and tissue engineering; and carcinogenesis. Three modules make up the course: a) stem cells and cell signaling; b) organogenesis of the gut  the organ system changes each year). c) an exercise in writing a scientific proposal. 

Course objectives are: a) to provide students with a current, in- depth, multidisciplinary view of the processes of organogenesis: b) to highlight target areas of future research; c) to read and discuss significant papers in the field; and d) to practice the design and preparation of a research grant by writing a "miniproposal".

Deneen Wellik

 

681 Organogenesis of Complex Tissues (1)

682 Organogenesis of Complex Tissues (1)

CDB 681 will be offered in odd numbered years; CDB 682 will be offered in even numbered years. The two course descriptions are identical, but each year will focus on a different organ system; thus students can elect these courses for two years in a row and receive different content.

CDB 681/CDB 682 will cover multiple aspects of organogenesis, including: morphological and molecular events underlying organ formation; in vitro and in vivo experimental systems; parallel pathways for organ formation in various model organisms; adult organ structure and pathology; organ regeneration/repair; stem cell systems: cell and tissue engineering; and carcinogenesis. Two modules make up the course: a) organogenesis of the gut (for Fall 2011; the organ system changes each year); b) an exercise in writing a scientific proposal. The course will begin in early October; exact date TBD.  

Course objectives are: a) to provide students with a current, in- depth, multidisciplinary view of the processes of organogenesis: b) to highlight target areas of future research; c) to read and discuss significant papers in the field; and d) to practice the design and preparation of a research grant by writing a "miniproposal".

Gumucio

More information will be available in the near future. Please go to http://www.med.umich.edu/medschool/organo/courses.htm for updates.

715 Stem Cell Biology (3)

The goal of the course is to acquaint students with the biology of stem cells from the most primitive embryonic stem (ES) cells to the well characterized hematopoietic stem cell system. The course is taught with a focus on developmental biology; neural stem cells; stem cells of the gut, skin, muscle; and on cell biology: apoptosis and cell renewal. Students present current literature after brief faculty lecture. 

O'Shea

 

801 Graduate Seminar (1)

The graduate student seminar is currently a student-run seminar that meets once a week at lunchtime, with lunch catered in once a month. Students give presentations of their laboratory work, or present literature pertinent to that work, and feedback is given by the student-only audience. This seminar format allows students to share their findings and receive criticism and advice from their peers in a casual setting. Students also discuss graduate student affairs and give updates on the activities of the various departmental and university committees in which they participate. Additionally, this time may be used for the students to meet as a group with members of the faculty to discuss and plan departmental events such as recruiting weekend and preliminary exams. 

Barolo 

 

990 Dissertation (Pre-Candidate) 1–8

 

995 Dissertation (Candidate) 1–8

 

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